[freedomtowernight_edited.jpg] 26th Parallel: Cuban Immigrants Adjust to U.S. Life

Tuesday, July 11, 2006

Cuban Immigrants Adjust to U.S. Life

"In Miami, life is hard. But it's not a lie.''
The above quote comes at the very end of a very well-written article in today's Herald by Oscar Corral. It deals with the touching stories of several recent arrivals from Cuba. Stories about their struggles in Cuba, the culture shock of arriving and adjusting to life in freedom, and the network of downright nice Miamians (OK, Hialeahans to be exact) which is making the hard adjustment a bit easier for those brave folks.

In a town where cynicism rules, where nothing is perceived to be genuine, "normal" and "as it should be", this story should warm the hearts of even the most jaded Miamians, as well as those elsewhere.

The American Dream is alive and well in Miami, Florida in 2006. We can all learn something from the article and from these folks who came here for a better life and don't take their newly-found freedom for granted.

Click here to read the story in its entirety, along with pictures and an extra article which is also highly recommended reading.

1 Comments:

Blogger Henry "Conductor" Gomez said...

I think that Corral is partially right. Many of the recent arrivals are not politically vocal because of their fatigue of the constant debate about US/Cuba politics. But I don't think this is a permanent state of affairs. They have a lot of other pressing needs to attend to instead of debating. But as one spends more time here and gets established, then one feels more free to opine. Today Marielitos are very well assimiliated into our Cuban-American enclave. They are oftentimes 20 years younger than the previous wave of immigrants but their voices too can be heard on talk radio, etc. And so it will be with these younger/newer arrivals. It's hard for someone who's been here 2 months to have formed an intelligent opinion about the merits of our "system". Even the vocabulary tips you off to the fact they were indoctinated. Most Americans don't think of the way we live as a "system".

11:17 AM, July 11, 2006  

Post a Comment

<< Home